Greetings and Numbers (OOVC-CH1 2020-11-02)

This lesson covers some simple greetings which are useful every day, as well as the numbers from zero to ten in Hawaiian. Also discussed is the distinction between numbers for counting to oneself and numbers for summarizing quantity.

Video Outline

  1. Some useful greetings and other short expressions
  2. Online resource to allow you to listen to native speaker greetings (Kaniʻāina)
  3. Numbers from zero to ten

Length: 55 minutes

Lesson Resources

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  1. Class notes by kumu Kaliko (PDF)
  2. Numbers Reinforcement Lesson (PDF)

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Previous and Next Lessons

  1. Previous: 8202V Macrons, Word Stress, and Articles (OOVC-CH1 2020-10-26)
  2. Next: (not yet available)

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Macrons, Word Stress, and Articles (OOVC-CH1 2020-10-26)

In this video lesson, Kaliko explains "macrons" (the small lines often written above vowelsand called "kahakō" in Hawaiian), penultimate word stress and how to pronounce Hawaiian words, as well as some simple articles such as "a", "that", "this", and "the" which are called "kaʻi" in Hawaiian.

Note that I originally called the video "Kahakō, Kaʻi, and Memeʻa" but a few minutes after class started, we veered off course and I ended up talking about word stress, which actually was a great topic to approach at this time! So although we got to the part about "kaʻi" (articles), we never made it to my final intended point ("memeʻa" content words), so that topic will be left for another day.

Video Outline

  1. Macrons (kahakō) are the lines written above a vowel only
  2. Word Stress in Hawaiian
  3. Showing primary word stress with examples
  4. Introduction to Hawaiian “Kaʻi” (articles)
  5. he, kēlā, kēia, ka, ke
  6. The "KEAO" rule for "ka" and "ke"

Length: 53 minutes

Lesson Resources

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  1. Class notes by kumu Kaliko (PDF)
  2. Kaʻi & Memeʻa Lesson Sheet (PDF)

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The Hawaiian Alphabet (OOVC-CH1 2020-10-19)

This lesson explains the Hawaiian letters of the alphabet and how they sound. It is the very first lesson for absolute beginners learning Hawaiian language in the ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom. There are no notes to accompany the video.

Video Outline

  1. Introduction
  2. The Hawaiian alphabet and its sounds

Length: 1 hour 4 minutes

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Streaming or Downloading Videos

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E Kōkua i nā Kūpuna ʻElua ʻo “Pepeke ʻAike He” lāua ʻo “Pepeke ʻAike ʻO”

Aloha nui, e kuʻu makamaka ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi.

Eia kahi mea aʻu i manaʻo ai e hōʻike aku iā ʻoe, i hiki paha iā ʻoe ke kōkua i ke olakino nāwaliwali o ʻelua kupuna i waena o kākou, he mau kūpuna hoʻi e waiho wale ʻia nei ma ko lāua hikieʻe ma ke kūʻono o ko kākou hale! A ke kiʻi a kū a hele aʻe, he hele kāpekepeke kā! Aloha ʻino ia ʻanakē a me ia ʻanakala!

Eia ko lāua mau inoa: ʻo Pepeke ʻAike He a me Pepeke ʻAike ʻO!

I loko nō o ka hiki ke kālele i ka piko ma ka hoʻolele ʻana i mua (kapa au i kēia he "piko kaumua"), nui ʻino ka hana pēlā na ka poʻe ʻōlelo o kēia wā. E nānā aku ka maka i nā palapala a ka poʻe kākau! E hoʻolohe ka pepeiao i nā māpunaʻōlelo a ka poʻe ʻōlelo! I koʻu kuhi, ma muli paha ia o ke "kiʻina kāpili manaʻo" maʻamau ke ʻōlelo i ka ʻōlelo haole:

  • My car is a good car — (X) "ʻO koʻu kaʻa, he kaʻa maikaʻi"
  • My car is the good car. — (X) "ʻO koʻu kaʻa, ʻo ia ke kaʻa maikaʻi"

E aho loa ke hoʻopuka aʻe i ka Pepeke ʻAike He a me ka Pepeke ʻAike ʻO ma ke ʻano e Hawaiʻi ai ka ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi, penei:

  • My car is a good car. => He kaʻa maikaʻi koʻu kaʻa.
  • My car is the good car. => ʻO ke kaʻa maikaʻi koʻu kaʻa, a i ʻole
  • ʻO koʻu kaʻa ke kaʻa maikaʻi.

E like paha me kēia:

  • "ʻO kekahi ala hoʻoponopono, ʻo ia nō ka 'hana kope' ʻana i ka haʻawina lā."
  • ʻO kekahi ala hoʻoponopono ka 'hana kope' ʻana i ka haʻawina lā.
  • ʻO ka 'hana kope' ʻana i ka haʻawina lā kekahi ala hoʻoponopono.

E ʻoluʻolu, e kākoʻo pū mai i ia mau kūpuna ʻelua e ʻauana kāpekepeke nei i waena o kākou i kēia wā.

naʻu, me ke aloha mau i ka ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi
na kumu Kaliko
´¨)
¸.· ´¸.·*´¨) ¸.·*¨)
(¸.·´ (¸.·Kaliko

Hawaiian language analysis of the song “Puamana” (1401M)

Introduction

This is a beautiful and popular mele from 1937, with lyrics by Charles Kekua Farden (words) and music by Irmgard Farden ʻĀluli (1911-2001), a well known composer from Maui.

"Puamana" was written for the Farden home (built by Charles on Front Street in Lahaina at a location called “Puamana”; the family moved into it in 1916) as well as to happily reflect on the time spent there as a family.

In this lesson, we will go over the song, line by line, in order to learn some basic Hawaiian sentence patterns and idioms that will help you on your path to speaking Hawaiian language.

To learn more about the wonderful Auntie Irmgard, her songs, and her performing group, please see the Wikipedia page under her name.

Listen to the song and learn more

The following links can be used to hear great versions of this song and learn more about the composer.

(1) “Puamana” with Irmgard Farden Aluli

  • this I would say would be the “canonical” version of the song
  • performed by Irmgard and her daughters
  • danced by kumu hula Vicky Holt Takamine
  • video from 1993 - so it’s not great quality unfortunately, but the music is lovely!
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j81g9W-4P6g

(2) “Puamana” from the Mountain Apple Company

(3) “Dennis Pavao ‘Puamana‘ Ka Leo Kiʻekiʻe”

  • a wonderful performance from a fantastic album
  • makes common “onaona” mistake (verse 1) - he says " ʻonaʻona"
  • Dennis mispronounces “i ka ulu o ka niu” (verse 2) and “i ka ʻae kai” (verse 3), both common mistakes
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLZQxHlXggA

(4) “Puamana - The Farden ʻOhana”

(5) “Puamana (1991)” : A portrait of composer Irmgard Farden Aluli

(6) “A Musical Journey ~ Puamana” another portrait of composer Irmgard Farden Aluli

(7) “Long Story Short With Leslie Wilcox: Mihana Souza | PBS Hawaiʻi”

…And there are dozens more…. Just search YouTube and you will see them. The videos listed above are plenty enough, however, to get to know the song and the composer.

Hawaiian Lyrics

Puamana
Kuʻu home i Lahaina
Me nā pua ʻala onaona
Kuʻu home i aloha ʻia

Kuʻu home
I ka ulu o ka niu
ʻO ka niu kū kilakila
(He) napenape mālie

Home nani
Home i ka ʻae kai
Ke kōnane a ka mahina
I ke kai hāwanawana

Haʻina
ʻIa mai ka puana
Kuʻu home i Lahaina
I piha me ka hauʻoli

Video Lesson and Notes

The following video will take you through the entire mele line-by-line. The detailed notes, written by kumu Kaliko, are also available as a PDF. You will learn basic Hawaiian language patterns and vocabulary, as well as the way that the language is used to recount the wonderful memories of the composer's home, Puamana.

Lyrics Sheet & Class Notes

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Video Outline

  1. Introduction
  2. Analysis (starts at minute 7:00 in the video)
  3. Wrap-up

Instructional Length: 1 hour

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Hoʻomaʻamaʻa “Nui”, Nonoʻa, and Iʻoahenua Combined Practice 1

Fill in the form below and send it to Kumu Kaliko to check!

The meaning of "normal" and "compressed" for this form in regards to the possessives is illustrated below:

  1. ka hale o ka ʻīlio [NORMAL possessive]
  2. ko ka ʻīlio hale [COMPRESSED possessive]

Hana paʻa!
kumu Kaliko

Translate these phrases using either the normal or compressed possessive structure

[NORMAL]
[COMPRESSED)
[NORMAL]
[COMPRESSED)
[NORMAL]
[COMPRESSED)

Translate these sentences using "Nui" at the beginning

Combine "Nui" and Normal or Compressed Possessives

[NUI + NORMAL)
.[NUI + COMPRESSED)
[Nui + COMPRESSED]
[NUI + NORMAL)

Translate the sentences using "Nui" and/or Possessives, and Iʻoahenua

[NUI + IʻOAHENUA]
[NUI + NORMAL + IʻOAHENUA]
[NUI + COMPRESSED + IʻOAHENUA]
[NUI + NORMAL + IʻOAHENUA]
[NUI + COMPRESSED + IʻOAHENUA]