ʻŌlelo Online Session Sampler

October to December Session, 2021

This is a sample of the classes from the ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom session which started in October 2021 and ended mid-December.

You can use this to get an idea perhaps of kinds of things we do in class and what level of Hawaiian is targeted.

Class CH1A – Absolute Beginner Hawaiian Language

This was class number six in a session of eight classes in which the concept of “kāhulu” (modifiers) was introduced.

CH1 from November 29, 2021




Class CH2A – Level 2A Hawaiian Language

This was also class number six in a session of eight classes in which we talked about the sixth installment of one of the stories of ʻAiʻai, a famous chief from the ancient past.

CH2A from November 29, 2021




Class CH2B – Level 2B Hawaiian Language

This was class number seven in a session of eight classes in which we started looking at a newspaper advertisement/letter from 1856 about huge piles of salt at Keālia, Maui, with the writer asking if anyone would like to buy it and perhaps resell for a profit.

CH2B from December 7, 2021




Class CH3A – Level 3A Hawaiian Language

This was class number five in a session of eight classes in which we went over installment number five of the Hawaiian account of the arrival of Captain Cook in Hawaiʻi in 1778.

CH3A from November 17, 2021




Class CH3B – Level 3B Hawaiian Language

This was class number four in a session of eight classes in which we went over installment number four of the legendary story of ʻIwa, the young thief famous for his exploits working for himself, for high chief ʻUmi, and for anyone who would take his services. He was excellent at double-crossing everyone.

CH3B from November 11, 2021




Class CH4 – Level 4 Hawaiian Language

This was class number three in a session of eight classes in which we went over installment number three of of a very silly story printed in the Hawaiian newspapers of the mid-1800s about a lad named Keaka Pepa (lit., “Jack Paper” or “Jack Card”, possibly referring to a playing card) who meets up with a magical cow and recounts their journey together through thick and thin.

CH4 from November 3, 2021




Class MH1 (Papa Mele) Hawaiian Song Analysis

This was class number one in the session of eight classes in which we went over the two Hawaiian mele (songs) written by famous composer Helen Desha Beamer, adoptive great-grandmother of your teacher Kaliko Beamer-Trapp through his hānai mother, Aunty Nona Beamer. One song was “Kawohikūkapulani” and the other was “Pua Malihini”.

Papa Mele MH1 from October 19, 2021

Hawaiʻi Is My Native Land

Inā he haumāna ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi ma kekahi o nā papa ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom, e ʻeʻe no ka ʻike ʻana i kēia palapala.

Please log in if you are a current student of the ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom to read the rest of this article about “Hawaiʻi Is My Birthplace”.

E Ola Ka ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi

Here is a video you need to watch if you are going to be part of the Hawaiian language “revitalization movement”!

It will explain a little about the history of the decline of the Hawaiian language over the past 120 years, how the Pūnana Leo preschools and Hawaiian “immersion” schools were started, and what we are thinking in terms of language preservation and perpetuation.

The film is in Hawaiian too, so lots of chance to practice your listening skills!

Luckily, I have for you a version with subtitles in English, so you can follow along and get the main idea. If you want to really work on your listening skills, watch the Hawaiian-only version and pay attention to the sounds, the actions, and the keiki and so on.

Please log in to be able to access the rest of this item.

Moana ma ka ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi

Inā he haumāna ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi ma kekahi o nā papa ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom, e ʻeʻe no ka ʻike ʻana i kēia palapala.

Please log in if you are a current student of the ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom to read the rest of this article about the movie “Moana” in Hawaiian language.

CH1 Materials Index 202110

Session 202110: Oct – Dec 2021

Here are the links for the class videos for the October to December 2021 session.

This section is for current members of ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom.

Virtual Classroom students should log in to access the video links. If you are not a student in the ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom, you might be interested to learn more about it at the Virtual Classroom Offerings Page.

Materials Index

CH1 Conversational Hawaiian Level 1 Materials
Week #DateTitleVideo Link
Week 1Oct 18Hawaiian Alphabet
Week 2Oct 25Kaʻi + Memeʻa
Week 3Nov 01First Sentences
Week 4Nov 08Pepeke!
Week 5Nov 15Numbers & Pepeke Henua
Week 6Nov 29Intro to Kāhulu
Week 7Dec 06Pepeke ʻAike He
Week 8Dec 13Intro To Papani

Handouts and Other Texts

(We are still in the process of adding this material to the page. Please come back soon for the remainder.

Numbers Quiz: Matching 0 to 10

Quiz 0502-Q1

Numbers 1-10 Match. Select one item on the right to match the number on the left.

1. Match each of the following.
ʻole
zero

Unselect

three

Unselect

seven

Unselect

five

Unselect

one

Unselect

kahi
zero

Unselect

three

Unselect

seven

Unselect

five

Unselect

one

Unselect

kolu
zero

Unselect

three

Unselect

seven

Unselect

five

Unselect

one

Unselect

lima
zero

Unselect

three

Unselect

seven

Unselect

five

Unselect

one

Unselect

hiku
zero

Unselect

three

Unselect

seven

Unselect

five

Unselect

one

Unselect

Question 1 of 8

2. Match each of the following.
kahi
one

Unselect

four

Unselect

two

Unselect

three

Unselect

lua
one

Unselect

four

Unselect

two

Unselect

three

Unselect

kolu
one

Unselect

four

Unselect

two

Unselect

three

Unselect

one

Unselect

four

Unselect

two

Unselect

three

Unselect

Question 2 of 8

3. Match each of the following.
lua
two

Unselect

four

Unselect

six

Unselect

eight

Unselect

two

Unselect

four

Unselect

six

Unselect

eight

Unselect

ono
two

Unselect

four

Unselect

six

Unselect

eight

Unselect

walu
two

Unselect

four

Unselect

six

Unselect

eight

Unselect

Question 3 of 8

4. Match each of the following.
ʻole
zero

Unselect

ten

Unselect

eight

Unselect

seven

Unselect

hiku
zero

Unselect

ten

Unselect

eight

Unselect

seven

Unselect

walu
zero

Unselect

ten

Unselect

eight

Unselect

seven

Unselect

ʻumi
zero

Unselect

ten

Unselect

eight

Unselect

seven

Unselect

Question 4 of 8

5. Match each of the following.
lima
eight

Unselect

five

Unselect

seven

Unselect

six

Unselect

ono
eight

Unselect

five

Unselect

seven

Unselect

six

Unselect

hiku
eight

Unselect

five

Unselect

seven

Unselect

six

Unselect

walu
eight

Unselect

five

Unselect

seven

Unselect

six

Unselect

Question 5 of 8

6. Match each of the following.
lua
two

Unselect

eight

Unselect

four

Unselect

six

Unselect

ten

Unselect

two

Unselect

eight

Unselect

four

Unselect

six

Unselect

ten

Unselect

ono
two

Unselect

eight

Unselect

four

Unselect

six

Unselect

ten

Unselect

walu
two

Unselect

eight

Unselect

four

Unselect

six

Unselect

ten

Unselect

ʻumi
two

Unselect

eight

Unselect

four

Unselect

six

Unselect

ten

Unselect

Question 6 of 8

7. Match each of the following.
kolu
six

Unselect

nine

Unselect

three

Unselect

ono
six

Unselect

nine

Unselect

three

Unselect

iwa
six

Unselect

nine

Unselect

three

Unselect

Question 7 of 8

8. Match each of the following.
kolu
four

Unselect

five

Unselect

three

Unselect

six

Unselect

four

Unselect

five

Unselect

three

Unselect

six

Unselect

lima
four

Unselect

five

Unselect

three

Unselect

six

Unselect

ono
four

Unselect

five

Unselect

three

Unselect

six

Unselect

Question 8 of 8


 

Sentence Comprehension Quiz #1

This quiz is for students who know some basic Pepeke sentence patterns.

Your goal is to read the English prompt for each question and then decide which of the given answers best matches the prompt.

The patterns included are the following:

  • “something is somewhere or somewhen” (Pepeke Henua)
  • “something is in a particular state or condition” (Pepeke Painu ʻAʻano)
  • “something is doing something” (Pepeke Painu Hamani/Hehele)

We hope you enjoy this fairly easy quiz which is the first in a set of “sentence comprehension” quizzes.

Please go to Sentence Comprehension Quiz #1 to view this quiz

Memeʻa Quiz #5

This quiz is the third of three which will test (1) your ability to understand basic Hawaiian sentences, and (2) to add the correct missing word in each sentence from the answers provided. This quiz is best suited, therefore, for students who already know some basic Pepeke sentence patterns.

This quiz is one step more difficult than Memeʻa Quiz #4 because we have left out some of the helpful pictures in order that you focus on the written language to get a feeling of the context.

The patterns included are the following:

  • “something is somewhere or somewhen” (Pepeke Henua)
  • “something is in a particular state or condition” (Pepeke Painu ʻAʻano)
  • “something is doing something” (Pepeke Painu Hamani/Hehele)

We are sure you will have fun figuring out which memeʻa you should use to fill in the gap in each sentence prompt. Read the sentences out loud to yourself and try to get a feeling for where the poʻo, piko, and ʻawe are.

The vocabulary is drawn from lesson 0604V Memeʻa Content Words. There is no English translation for the sentence prompts, so if you need help working out the meanings, refer to the Wehewehe Wikiwiki dictionary portal.

Uihā! E kau ma ka lio a holo!

Please go to Memeʻa Quiz #5 to view this quiz