Band App For Virtual Classroom

About Band And How To Set It Up


INTRODUCTION

Since late January 2024, the ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom has been using a free social media app called “Band” to serve as a centralized hub for disseminating class materials, as well as a place for students to communicate with each other between weekly classes.

Each class level is given a private group Band at the start of the Session. The Band then serves as the repository for a wide range of resources including videos, notes, documents, homework assignments, and conversations within the group during the eight-week Session of classes.

When the Session concludes, the class Band is archived but is still accessible for about twelve months.

Primary Advantages

  • more reliable than email
  • convenient and accessible
  • configurable notifications about updates
  • helps keep students informed and engaged
  • students can use Band with their preferred devices
  • social-media style familiar and user-friendly interface
  • allows for students to practice reading and writing in Hawaiian
  • collaborative learning and peer support outside of normal class times
A grid of class icons in Band

An example set of Band icons in the Band Dashboard.

GET STARTED WITH BAND

The best way we find to use Band is via their website using a desktop or laptop computer. There are also apps available for Android and iOS (iPhones) if you prefer.


Create Your Band Account

There are two ways you can get started with a Band account:

  1. Click the Band link sent to you by email from ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom around the start of the Session; or
  2. Go directly to the Band website, create your account, and then go find the email mentioned in #1 and click the link.

Either way you do it, you will need to follow the steps outlined below to create your Band account. Read this ahead of time so you know what to expect.


Steps To Create An Account

  1. Decide if you want to use your email address or phone number as primary login.
  2. Enter either your email address or phone number.
  3. Create a password (see suggestion below).
  4. Choose a “display name” — use your “friendly” classroom name!
  5. Enter a date of birth to prove you are older than 13. Note: It doesn’t have to be your real birth date if you don’t want to use that.
  6. Finish the signup process.

A Note About Passwords

Band passwords are unfortunately limited to only 16 characters, so I recommend you pick a good Hawaiian word or two (without ʻokina or kahakō) and then put them with a two to four-digit number and you’ll have a great unique password. And to be safe, don’t use a password that you use on another service. You can separate the parts of the password with a character like a period or hypen if you like. Here’s an example: onaona-puaa.2024


Verify Your Band Account

Following this, you will need to verify your primary login method by entering a verification code that Band sends you when you submit the Sign Up Form. You need to get this done within 60 minutes or it will time-out.

And you’re done!


Current Students: Don’t forget to use your emailed Band invitation link to both sign up for and join Band!




See you on Band!

Go To Top / Rev. 2024-03-17

International Time Clocks

Clocks For Various Timezones

Time on the Quarter Hour (0516G)

Introduction

This lesson continues on from 0514G Telling Time On The Hour in which the basic structure for telling time in Hawaiian is introduced, as well as 0515G Time On The Half Hour which took you one tick more. Make sure you feel comfortable with those lessons before moving into this one.

In this lesson, you will learn how to tell the time on the quarter hour. Here are some examples:

  • It’s 1:45 (“one forty-five” or “quarter to two”)
  • It’s 8:15 in the morning.
  • It’s 12:45 (“twelve forty-five” or “quarter to one”).
  • It’s quarter to 9 at night.

Basic Pattern For Time On The Quarter-Hour

The word for a “quarter” or a “fourth” is hapahā in Hawaiian: hapa (part) + (four). We are going to use the word hapahā in all of these quater-hour sentences.

As we learned in previous lessons, the structure of the sentence follows what we call the pepeke ʻaike (equational) format, but I would suggest that at this point it will be better for you to just memorize the patterns in the examples below and note the parts which you can change to vary the time. The basic pattern always stays the same.

  • 10:15 – ʻO ka hapahā kēia i hala ka hola ʻumi.
  • 10:45 – ʻO ka hapahā kēia i koe kani ka hola ʻumikūmākahi.

We also have the option of moving the word “kēia” to the end of the pattern (as shown below), which is actually also possible with any of the time expressions. My personal recommendation is that you leave “kēia” in the middle of the phrase or leave it out altogether.

  • 10:15 – ʻO ka hapahā i hala ka hola ʻumi kēia.
  • 10:45 – ʻO ka hapahā i koe kani ka hola ʻumikūmākahi kēia.

As you can tell, things start to get quite a bit more complicated when using the quarter hours. It is possible, of course, to say something akin to “It’s 15 minutes past 10” or “It’s 45 minutes past ten” or “It’s 15 minutes to 11”; please see the next lesson, 0516G (not yet available), to learn how to tell minutes before and after the hour.

But for now, let’s stick with these quarter-hour expressions, starting with the expression for “quarter past” the hour.

A Quarter Past The Hour

The literal meaning for “ʻO ka hapahā kēia i hala ka hola ʻumi” is “this is the quarter (hour) past 10 o’clock”. You most likely won’t be able to make much sense out of trying to analyze “i hala ka hola” at this point, so my advice is to just memorize the format so you only need to change the hour number. Keep the amount of brain energy spent on this kind of analysis to a minimum for now!

A Quarter To The Hour

For “quarter to” expressions, follow the format shown in the example. The literal meaning for “ʻO ka hapahā kēia i koe kani ka hola ʻumikūmākahi” is “this is the quarter (hour) remaining until the sounding of 11 o’clock.” This expression comes from the days when many wall clocks chimed the hour and half-hour in the 1800s and early 1900s. Interesting! I grew up with one of those clocks in every house my family had; perhaps you did too! Use that experience to help you remember this structure.

Further Examples

Here are a few more examples:

  • 2:15 – ʻO ka hapahā kēia i hala ka hola ʻelua.
  • 2:45 – ʻO ka hapahā kēia i koe kani ka hola ʻekolu.
  • 9:15 – ʻO ka hapahā kēia i hala ka hola ʻeiwa.
  • 9:45 – ʻO ka hapahā kēia i koe kani ka hola ʻumi.

Notice that the “quarter to” times require the upcoming hour number, just as in English.

Next Steps

The next lesson will be how to tell the time down to the minute, but that lesson is not yet available. So for now, it’s time to go onto the 0600 Series of lessons which will introduce you to the word types that you will need to know about to start to create your own sentences.This is where things start to get really exciting! Here is the index for the 0600 Series.

Kalaiwa: Hamani or Hehele?

Ask ʻŌlelo Online

A request was received of late asking about the following:

The Question

“E ke kumu, he nīnau. In our study group we were discussing ia, iʻa, and . One of us had made a cheat sheet and listed as being ʻami lauka, but also used as a direction. Example: Kalaiwa au iā Joe. This was translated as ‘I drive to Joe.’ But I am thinking that this is an ʻami lauka and the translation would be ‘I drive Joe.’ But I donʻt want to argue this point if Iʻm wrong!”


The Response

E kuʻu haumāna ē, aloha nui! Pololei like ʻolua! ahaha. Maikaʻi loa!

The function of the ʻami would be understood by context.

Examples

Kalaiwa au iā Joe.

  • I drive Joe – ʻami lauka (direct object marker)
  • I drive to Joe – ʻami kuhilana (destination marker)

In use:

(1) Ua manaʻo mākou ʻelima e holo pū i Hilo, akā ʻaʻole i lawa ka lumi ma ka Honda Civic a Kalehua no ka poʻe a pau. No laila, ʻōlelo maila ʻo Kalehua, “Nāu e kalaiwa iā Joe ma kou kaʻa, a naʻu e kalaiwa i ka poʻe ʻē aʻe ma koʻu kaʻa.”

(2) Ua kelepona mai koʻu hoaaloha ma ke kahua mokulele ma Hilo. ʻAkahi a hōʻea mai ka ʻohana. Wahi a koʻu hoaaloha, aia lākou a pau ma waho o kahi e kiʻi ʻia ai nā ukana —ʻo Baggage Claim nō hoʻi— akā ua hele wāwae ʻo Joe i kahi e lele ai nā helekopa, no ka nānā nanea ʻana i nā helekopa o laila. Ua haʻi au i koʻu hoa, “Eia māua ʻo kuʻu wahine ma ʻelua kaʻa, ke holo nei iā ʻoukou! E holo ana au iā ʻoukou ma kahi o ka ukana, a e holo ana kuʻu wahine iā Joe ma kahi o nā helekopa.” Pane maila koʻu hoa, “Hō! Mahalo! No laila, na kāu wahine e kalaiwa iā Joe i laila?” ʻAe au iā iā, ” ʻAe, pololei.”

The Problem With “Kalaiwa”

As listed in the standard Hawaiian Dictionary by Pūkuʻi-Elbert (1984), “kalaiwa” is defined as follows:

nvt. To drive, as a car; driver; chauffeur. Eng. Kalaiwa kaʻa, to drive a car; car driver.

The thing is, using “kalaiwa” in place of “holo” is kind of a new thing and can create confusion. “Kalaiwa” is the hamani meaning “to drive something”; “holo” is the hehele meaning “to go somewhere by car” (in this case). But because English speakers use “drive” as both hamani and hehele, depending on context, many modern speakers of Hawaiian are starting to do the same.

Advice

I would say it would be best to keep them separate if possible; but regardless, in answer to your question about the ʻami lauka or ʻami kuhilana being valid here, both are indeed valid. I would just prefer “E holo ana au iā Joe” for “I am going to drive to Joe”, and “E kalaiwa ana au iā Joe” for “I am going to drive [=transport by vehicle] Joe.”

Hope that helps! :)

hoʻouna ʻia me ke aloha nui – sent with lots of aloha

na kumu Kaliko

Dog In A Wetsuit

As I always like to say, the name of the Hawaiian monk seal “ ʻīlio-holo-i-ka-uaua” literally means ‘dog swimming in a wetsuit’. This is different from the meaning given in the modern standard Hawaiian-English Pūkuʻi and Elbert dictionary which says it means “quadruped running in the rough [seas]”.

The monk seal has a canine-like appearance; thus “dog” is certainly appropriate.

The skin is very rubbery of course, and a word for this type of material traditionally is “uaua” (pronounced /u-áua/, NOT /úa-úa/ interestingly).

Hawaiian monk seal at French Frigate Shoals 07

Monk Seal Pup on French Frigate Shoals in 2014 by MarkSullivan CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

It was common to write the word “uaua” as “uwauwa” before Hawaiian spelling was fixed in the late 1970s to remove the letter “w” from words in which it cannot be pronounced as either /w/ or /v/. Thus I use the modern spelling “uaua” exclusively — the word cannot be pronouced /uvau-va/.

“Uaua” is an ʻaʻano, or adjective-like word. Even Pūkuʻi-Elbert say of their interpretation of “uaua” as a noun in the name for the Monk Seal that, “For a rare use of uaua as a noun, see ʻīlioholoikauaua.” I believe their use of “uaua” to mean rough seas is probably incorrect.

The Andrews Hawaiian language dictionary of 1865 gives the following definition for the word “U-WAU-WA”: “To be tight; fast; hard; e linalina, e moku ole, e paa” with the Hawaiian meaning “being soft and yielding to the touch, or tightly drawn, as a rope; unbreakable; tight, fast, secured, resistant, impenetrable”.

I first started using the term “dog in a wetsuit” as a fun and memorable way to describe the meaning of “ʻīlioholoikauaua” with my students back in the early 2000s, and was more than pleased when in 2022 I found a related use of the word “uaua” in a newspaper from 1866.

The Hawaiian newspaper “Ke Alaula” in an article from 1866 said of walrus skin: “O ka ili he uwauwa loa, a ua hoolilo ia i mea ili kauo no na lio kauo kaa ma Amerika” (He uaua loa ka ʻili, a ua hoʻolilo ʻia i mea ʻili kauō no nā lio kauō kaʻa ma ʻAmelika) meaning “The skin is a very tough and rubbery thing, and it has been used as a tow strap for horses drawing carts/carriages in America”.

There is always more one can do in looking for the meaning of words through time and how they are applied to various things like the monk meal, ʻīlioholoikauaua. For now, I will leave the topic and return to it when I learn more. If you have any thoughts or comments, feel free to let me know using the comments box below.

—kumu Kaliko

Anamanaʻo Papa ʻŌlelo Online

Course Evaluation Survey

This survey is for those of you who just took a course through the ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom. The information collected is anonymous unless you wish to identify yourself in the comments box. Your responses may be aggregated together with other students’ responses for statistical use, course improvement, and/or website publication. Mahalo for responding.


1.
E koho i kāu papa.*
What class did you take?

If you took multiple classes, please fill out a new survey for each.


2.
Ua waiwai ka papa iaʻu.*
The class was beneficial/useful to me.

Strongly DisagreeDisagreeNeutralAgreeStrongly Agree
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree

3.
Ua hoihoi nā kumuhana o ka papa iaʻu.*
The topics covered in class were interesting to me.

Strongly DisagreeDisagreeNeutralAgreeStrongly Agree
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree

4.
Hoihoi paha ʻoe e komo hou i kekahi papa ʻŌlelo Online?
Are you interested in taking another class with ʻŌlelo Online?


5.
E paipai ana paha ʻoe iā haʻi e komo i kekahi papa ʻŌlelo Online?
How likely might you be to refer someone else to an ʻŌlelo Online class?


6.
He mau manaʻo hoʻokāʻoi anei kou?
How could this class be improved in your opinion?


7.
Pehea ka nui o kou hauʻoli i kāu papa? *
How would you rate your overall class experience?


8.
Nā manaʻo ʻē aʻe.
Any other comments you may have.

ʻŌlelo Online Class Sampler

See What Classes Are Like

Shown below are some examples of the classes from the ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom taught by kumu Kaliko Beamer-Trapp

You can use this to get an idea of the kinds of things we do in class and what level of Hawaiian is targeted.

Kumu Kaliko chooses an overarching theme for each eight-week Session which then influences the type of instruction and the student experience: storytelling, analysis, discussion, sentence creation, grammar, listening practice, and more.

The following samples were taken from a Session focusing on reading and understanding traditional stories, accounts, and newspaper articles originally recorded in the 1800s.

Class CH1A – Absolute Beginner Hawaiian Language

This was class number six in the eight-week Session in which the concept of “kāhulu” (modifiers) was introduced.

CH1A from November 29, 2021


Class CH2A – Level 2A Hawaiian Language

In this CH2A class, we talked about the sixth installment of one of the stories of ʻAiʻai, a famous chief from the ancient past.

CH2A from November 29, 2021


Class CH2B – Level 2B Hawaiian Language

In this CH2B-level class, we started looking at a newspaper advertisement-letter from 1856 about huge piles of salt at Keālia, Maui, with the writer asking if anyone would like to buy it and perhaps resell it for a profit elsewhere.

CH2B from December 7, 2021


Class CH3A – Level 3A Hawaiian Language

This is an example of a CH3A class in which we went over installment number five of the ancient Hawaiian language account of the arrival of Captain Cook in Hawaiʻi in 1778.

CH3A from November 17, 2021


Class CH3B – Level 3B Hawaiian Language

This was class number four in the eight-week Session in which we went over installment number four of the legendary story of ʻIwa, the young thief famous for his exploits working for himself, for high chief ʻUmi, and for anyone who would take his services. He was excellent at double-crossing everyone.

CH3B from November 11, 2021


Class CH4A – Level 4A Hawaiian Language

In this sample from CH4A, we went over installment number three of of a very silly story printed in the Hawaiian newspapers of the mid-1800s about a lad named Keaka Pepa (lit., “Jack Paper” or “Jack Card”, possibly referring to a playing card) who meets up with a magical cow and recounts their journey together through thick and thin.

CH4A from November 3, 2021


Class MH1 (Papa Mele) Hawaiian Song Analysis

In the Papa Mele shown below, we looked into the two Hawaiian mele (songs) written by famous composer Helen Desha Beamer, adoptive great-grandmother of your teacher Kaliko Beamer-Trapp through his hānai mother, Aunty Nona Beamer. One song was “Kawohikūkapulani” and the other was “Pua Malihini”.

Papa Mele MH1 from October 19, 2021

Hawaiʻi Is My Native Land

Inā he haumāna ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi ma kekahi o nā papa ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom, e ʻeʻe no ka ʻike ʻana i kēia palapala.

Please log in if you are a current student of the ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom to read the rest of this article about “Hawaiʻi Is My Birthplace”.

E Ola Ka ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi

Here is a video you need to watch if you are going to be part of the Hawaiian language “revitalization movement”!

It will explain a little about the history of the decline of the Hawaiian language over the past 120 years, how the Pūnana Leo preschools and Hawaiian “immersion” schools were started, and what we are thinking in terms of language preservation and perpetuation.

The film is in Hawaiian too, so lots of chance to practice your listening skills!

Luckily, I have for you a version with subtitles in English, so you can follow along and get the main idea. If you want to really work on your listening skills, watch the Hawaiian-only version and pay attention to the sounds, the actions, and the keiki and so on.

Please log in to be able to access the rest of this item.

Moana ma ka ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi

Inā he haumāna ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi ma kekahi o nā papa ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom, e ʻeʻe no ka ʻike ʻana i kēia palapala.

Please log in if you are a current student of the ʻŌlelo Online Virtual Classroom to read the rest of this article about the movie “Moana” in Hawaiian language.

Numbers Quiz: Matching 0 to 10

Quiz 0502-Q1

Numbers 1-10 Match. Select one item on the right to match the number on the left.

1. Match each of the following.
kolu
six

Unselect

nine

Unselect

three

Unselect

ono
six

Unselect

nine

Unselect

three

Unselect

iwa
six

Unselect

nine

Unselect

three

Unselect

Question 1 of 8

2. Match each of the following.
lua
two

Unselect

four

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

two

Unselect

four

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

ono
two

Unselect

four

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

walu
two

Unselect

four

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

Question 2 of 8

3. Match each of the following.
lua
six

Unselect

two

Unselect

ten

Unselect

four

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

two

Unselect

ten

Unselect

four

Unselect

eight

Unselect

ono
six

Unselect

two

Unselect

ten

Unselect

four

Unselect

eight

Unselect

walu
six

Unselect

two

Unselect

ten

Unselect

four

Unselect

eight

Unselect

ʻumi
six

Unselect

two

Unselect

ten

Unselect

four

Unselect

eight

Unselect

Question 3 of 8

4. Match each of the following.
kahi
nine

Unselect

seven

Unselect

one

Unselect

three

Unselect

five

Unselect

kolu
nine

Unselect

seven

Unselect

one

Unselect

three

Unselect

five

Unselect

lima
nine

Unselect

seven

Unselect

one

Unselect

three

Unselect

five

Unselect

hiku
nine

Unselect

seven

Unselect

one

Unselect

three

Unselect

five

Unselect

iwa
nine

Unselect

seven

Unselect

one

Unselect

three

Unselect

five

Unselect

Question 4 of 8

5. Match each of the following.
ten

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

four

Unselect

ono
ten

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

four

Unselect

walu
ten

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

four

Unselect

ʻumi
ten

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

four

Unselect

Question 5 of 8

6. Match each of the following.
kolu
three

Unselect

six

Unselect

five

Unselect

four

Unselect

three

Unselect

six

Unselect

five

Unselect

four

Unselect

lima
three

Unselect

six

Unselect

five

Unselect

four

Unselect

ono
three

Unselect

six

Unselect

five

Unselect

four

Unselect

Question 6 of 8

7. Match each of the following.
lima
seven

Unselect

five

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

ono
seven

Unselect

five

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

hiku
seven

Unselect

five

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

walu
seven

Unselect

five

Unselect

eight

Unselect

six

Unselect

Question 7 of 8

8. Match each of the following.
ʻole
zero

Unselect

eight

Unselect

ten

Unselect

seven

Unselect

hiku
zero

Unselect

eight

Unselect

ten

Unselect

seven

Unselect

walu
zero

Unselect

eight

Unselect

ten

Unselect

seven

Unselect

ʻumi
zero

Unselect

eight

Unselect

ten

Unselect

seven

Unselect

Question 8 of 8