Moving Parts of a Sentence Around

It is possible to move pieces of some sentences around, since each piece acts as its own individual unit (called a “poke” in Hawaiian), in somewhat the same way that childrens’ building blocks can be put together in many different ways. Listen and Repeat! Hoʻomākaukau!

  • E hele ana au i ke kahua mokulele i ka hola ʻelima – I will go to the airport at 5 o’clock.
  • I ka hola ʻelima, e hele ana au i ke kahua mokulele – At 5 o’clock, I will go to the airport.
  • E ʻai ana kākou i ka hola ʻeono, a laila, e haʻalele koke ana – We are all going to eat at six o’clock, and then we are going to quickly leave.
  • I ka hola ʻeono, e ʻai ana kākou. A laila, e haʻalele koke ana – At 6 o’clock, we are all going to eat. Then, we will quickly leave.
  • I ke kakahiaka, ala au a hana au i ka haʻawina – In the morning, I awake and work on my lessons.
  • Ala au i ke kakahiaka, a hana au i ka haʻawina – I awake in the morning, and I work on my lessons.
  • E nui ana nā malihini e lele mai ana i Hawaiʻi nei ma ʻApelila, Mei, Iune, a me ʻIulai. – there are going to be many tourists flying to Hawaiʻi here in April, May, June, and July,
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