Sentence Subject Using Kikino (Common Nouns)

While on Hawaiʻi island, we learned how to make an action occur in the future with e-ana, and the subject was either “kākou”, all of us, or “kāua” you and I. Now let’s learn how to use a kikino, or common noun, as a subject. The sentence order is the same as before, but the subject will have either “ka” or “ke” before it to mean “the” something. E hoʻolohe mai; listen:

Here’s what we already know:

E huakaʻi ana kākou = we will all travel;
“e huakaʻi ana” means “will travel”;
“kākou” means “all of us”.
E huakaʻi ana kākou.

And here’s our new lesson with our new subject:

E huakaʻi ana ka malihini = the visitor will travel.
“E huakaʻi ana” means “will travel”;
“ka malihini” means “the visitor”.
E huakaʻi ana ka malihini.

To practice, the action will stay the same, and the subject will change. Repeat after me. Hoʻomākaukau!

E ʻōlelo ana ke kanaka – the person will speak
E ʻōlelo ana ke koa – the warrior will speak
E ʻōlelo ana ke kupua – the demigod will speak
E ʻōlelo aka ka mikionali – the missionary will speak

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E unuhi mai. Translate the following. Hoʻomākaukau!

  • The person will speak – E ʻōlelo ana ke kanaka
  • The warrior will speak – E ʻōlelo ana ke koa
  • The demigod will speak – E ʻōlelo ana ke kupua
  • The missionary will speak – E ʻōlelo aka ka mikionali
  • The visitor will go surfing – E heʻenalu ana ka malihini

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